Criminalist Job Description & Career Outlook

Criminalist is a broad term that includes several jobs within the forensic science field. Criminalists examine physical evidence from a crime scene to create a link from the victim to the scene to the offender. Criminalists are sometimes referred to as lab techs or crime scene investigators (CSI).

Responsibilities of the criminalist include the examination and analysis of evidence collected from a crime scene. This includes a wide array of evidence and many criminalists specialize in certain aspects of evidence analysis. Examples of items that may be sent to a criminalist for examination include: fingerprints, hair, fibers, skins, blood, dirt, spent ammunition casings, bullets, insects and other items. Their task is to take the physical evidence and determine who, what, where, when and how a crime was committed. Their interpretation of the evidence is used in the prosecution of offenders, and criminalists are often called upon in court to offer expert testimony.

Find a School

Criminalists work in labs in local, state and federal law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. In rural areas, law enforcement agencies usually send evidence to the state crime labs for evaluation.

Criminalist Employment Training and Education Requirements

To become a criminalist there are minimum requirement and expected qualities. The minimum educational requirement is a bachelor’s degree with concentrated course work in biology, forensics or crime scene investigation; however, there is a growing trend toward requiring a minimum of a master’s degree in order to work for most state or federal agencies. In addition to formal education, the criminalist is also required to attend continuing training and coursework in order to stay current on trends, new procedures and methods. Criminalists also have the option of applying for certification from the American Board of Criminalists (which requires passing an extremely comprehensive and difficult test). Criminalist must have an eye for details.

Find a School

Criminalist Salary

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that forensic science technicians earn a median annual salary of $52,840 in the United States as of 2012 while the top 10% earn more than $85,210 per year.1

Criminalist Career Outlook

With increased emphasis being placed on forensic evidence in the conviction of offenders, career opportunities as a criminalist are expected to increase. Jobs for forensic science technicians are expected to grow 6% from 2012-2022 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.1

Schools with Criminal Justice Programs

Matching School Ads
request information

Walden University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • PhD in Criminal Justice - Public Management and Leadership-Advanced
  • PhD in Criminal Justice - Online Teaching in Higher Education-Advanced
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice - Crime and Criminals

request information

Keiser University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Criminal Justice, AA (Online)
  • Criminal Justice, BA (Online)
  • Homeland Security, BA (Online)

request information

Capella University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • MS - Criminal Justice
  • PhD - Criminal Justice
  • BS - Criminal Justice

request information

University of Phoenix
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • B.S. in Environmental Science
  • B.S. in Biological Science
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice Administration

request information

Keiser University Graduate School
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Criminal Justice, MA (Online)
  • Master of Arts in Homeland Security

request information

American InterContinental University Online
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Bachelor's of Science in Criminal Justice - Forensic Science
  • Bachelor's of Science in Criminal Justice - Law Enforcement
  • Associate's (AABA) - Criminal Justice Administration

request information

Averett University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice


References:
1. Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/forensic-science-technicians.htm

Page Edited by Charles Sipe.