Corrections Degree Program

When people think of law enforcement or public safety, the image that usually comes to mind is the officer working a beat, responding to calls and making arrest. However, the management of criminals after their arrest is a major aspect of the criminal justice system and a growing population of criminals in the nation’s corrections facilities generates an ongoing need for law enforcement personnel charged with managing criminals in detention.

Corrections Officer Training and Courses

A degree in corrections can help prepare the individual to provide superior public safety by giving the individual the knowledge and skills necessary to work in the growing field of corrections. Courses include history of corrections, correctional methods, public safety and working with individuals in a correctional environment. Correctional degrees are also referred to as criminal justice degrees with a concentration in corrections. Individuals can obtain anywhere from an associate’s degree to a doctorate degree in criminal justice.

Did you know? An estimated 12 million people each year are admitted and released at US jails.1 Although it is unfortunate that the number is so high, this means there is an ongoing demand for qualified correctional officers.

With increased crime, mandatory structured sentencing and growing inmate populations, corrections jobs remain in high demand. These jobs call for well educated, well trained individuals to meet the needs of the corrections industry. Additionally, command positions (sergeants, lieutenants, superintendents, etc.) often require a college degree. Depending on the level of degree sought, the program can be from 2 to 4 years.

Correctional Management Degree Requirements

Corrections degree program admission requirements include a desire to work in the corrections industry, a high school diploma or GED and good computer skills. Jobs are available in the private and public sectors with state and federal government employing the most correctional officers.

CJDS Fact According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, to be hired as an entry-level correctional officer at a federal prison, the Federal Bureau of Prisons requires a bachelor’s degree or higher or 3 years of relevant full-time experience.

Online Corrections Degree Info, Courses, and Criminal Justice Programs

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University of Phoenix
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • A.A. in Criminal Justice
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice Administration
  • B.S in Criminal Justice Administration/Cybercrimes

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American InterContinental University Online
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Corrections and Case Management
  • Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Generalist
  • Associate of Science in Criminal Justice

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Kent State University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • Master's - Criminology & Criminal Justice - Victimology
  • Master's - Criminology & Criminal Justice - Corrections
  • Master's - Criminology & Criminal Justice - Police

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Post University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • B.S. in Human Services / Criminal Justice
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice - Law Enforcement
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice

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Capella University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • MS - Criminal Justice
  • PhD - Criminal Justice
  • BS - Criminal Justice

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Grand Canyon University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • B.S. in Justice Studies

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Liberty University
Campuses: 1Online
Popular Degrees:

  • BS in Criminal Justice
  • AA in Criminal Justice
  • Masters in Criminal Justice: Command College


What Jobs Can You Get With a Corrections Degree?

Graduates with a degree in corrections are well positioned to apply for jobs as corrections officers and police officers.

Some examples of job titles available to graduates include:

You can also view current job openings in your state and research job requirements at our criminal justice job board.

References:
1. John Jay College of Criminal Justice: http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/Final_Life_After_Lockup.pdf

Page Edited by Charles Sipe.